Exhibition Construction Systems: Five elements and a marker pen

How do construction system innovations come about? The idea behind them is often very simple. It’s all about gaining attention.

Motionskin, the new system from beMatrix, combines three elements: images, light and movement. (Photo: beMatrix)
Motionskin, the new system from beMatrix, combines three elements: images, light and movement. (Photo: beMatrix)

Three seconds: that’s all the time an exhibition stand has to attract the attention of passing trade fair visitors. If the opportunity is missed, the stand is overlooked and ignored – an exhibition hall is, after all, a very busy environment that can overload the senses. There are five elements that attract attention in displays and banners: colour, light, movement, sound and smell. Motionskin, the new system from beMatrix, combines three of these five elements: images, light and movement. beMatrix describes Motionskin as a new light box with dynamic content. It is an innovation for the graphic design of exhibition stands. 

The light box shows images that change abruptly or in a smooth flow. Depending on what is recorded, there may be flashes, light figures or animations that move through the light box in three dimensions. “Motionskin catches the eye. It closes the gap between typical light boxes and LEDskin, our self-luminous tile,” emphasises Pieter Lecluyse, beMatrix’s global marketing manager. “Both systems fit seamlessly into our framework system, beMatrix’s DNA. The boxes can be combined in any direction.” It is not part of beMatrix’s philosophy to come up with systems such as Motionskin purely to catch the eye or operate as a stand-alone solution. Headquartered in Roeselare, Belgium, the system manufacturer takes a comprehensive approach to design. It enables exhibitors to create systematic brand experiences with its modular solutions for exhibition stands, event construction and displays. To facilitate this, the company supports its customers with a worldwide network of partners consisting of exhibition stand construction companies, agencies and printing companies. The name of the network is bePartner. It provides full-service support from design to assembly and, finally,  handover of the stand (www.beMatrix.com).

Gilnhammer developed a wall system for Swiss Post. (Photo: Gilnhammer)
Gilnhammer developed a wall system for Swiss Post. (Photo: Gilnhammer)

One way to stand out visually is to have individually designed walls. There could hardly be a more individual way to customise a stand than to use your own personal signature. Gilnhammer, a company based in Maitenbeth near Munich, developed a wall system for Swiss Post that does exactly that – and more. The walls are covered with a laminate that can be written on using a marker pen with soluble ink. You can write on them and change their appearance during a trade fair – whether you are the exhibitor, a speaker or a visitor – by signing your name or adding a comment. The walls are also magnetic, enabling messages to be attached to them and positioned. “Consequently, the stand’s appearance can change constantly,” says managing director Thomas Gilnhammer, outlining the benefits. 

The product behind this is G40: a 44 mm thick, lightweight wall system with a sandwich structure. At its centre is a lightweight honeycomb layer. The outer layers consist of a special black laminate. Gilnhammer made a total of 89 of these lightweight wall panels for the exhibitor, together with 91 lightweight collars and two lightweight doors. The result was a total of almost 350 square metres of wall that could be written on with a marker pen. Nearly 150 square metres of wall was also magnetic on both sides. Swiss Post also had four small satellite stands at the same trade fair. “The design had something light and inviting about it and had to be as modular as possible so as to be able to realise all sizes with a minimum of effort,” says Gilnhammer, explaining the customer’s requirements. The concept was developed by the agency Aroma Production AG (www.gilnhammer.de). 

Author: Jens Kügler

This article was published in TFI issue 4/2018

New system catches the eye

Photo: Infinityconst
Photo: Infinityconst

The launch of the Infinityconst exhibition system in Germany got off to a successful start in September with not one but two interesting projects. StandPunkt Messebau created an impressive exhibition stand with a footprint of over 900 square metres for Fritsch. A wave-like Infinityconst ceiling structure was placed on top of a two-storey stand, creating a striking impression. The decorative, biomorphic shapes of Infinityconst contrasted sharply with the otherwise cubical design. Another project was completed for Tvema at InnoTrans 2018 in Berlin. A curved, backlit suspended ceiling became a point of reference in the exhibition hall and really caught the eye. In addition, engineers and exhibition stand constructors tested the compatibility of the exhibition system with Mero systems in a workshop. The result impressed everyone involved. Mero fits in well with Infinityconst and can build bridges to its design world, both technically and visually. That provides additional design options: new combinations can also lend minimalist architecture an innovative and elegant appearance. The UFI (Global Association of the Exhibition Industry) met in late October/early November in Saint Petersburg, where Infinityconst is based. That was reason enough to present the new exhibition system to the international exhibition industry audience at the 85th UFI Global Congress (www.infinityconst.de). 

 
 

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